Mulsanne's Corner NEWS

Mulsanne's Corner NEWS isn't meant to be THE source for up to date news items.  Instead what we are doing is providing an archive for information collected through out the Net related to new car developments.  Occasionally we do post first hand gathered items, but most of the time it is news from secondary sources such as dailysportscar.com or Autosport.  We will provide all sources for any news item shown here.


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June 2005
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6.25.05

>>Another new prototype was revealed over the Le Mans weekend, the Zulltec CZ-01 LMP2.  Zulltec's facility is located in Seine et Marne, in the town of Nanteuil les Meaux, which is about 30 miles east of Paris, France and is run by Yves Cazard and Mane Vignjevic.  The Zulltec CZ-01 was designed using CFD (Fluent) in conjunction with 15 days with a 33% model in the Aero Concepts Engineering (ACE) wind tunnel at Magny Cours (former Prost wind tunnel).  Already the car is at an advanced state of manufacture with the body work patterns and molds completed.  The CZ-01's carbon tub has also been completed and will be crash tested some time in September with the intent of putting the car on the track by October of this year.  The Zulltec's engine comes courtesy Menard Competition Technologies and in fact is based upon their formerly Infiniti IRL powerplant.

Zulltec is looking for potential customers as well as possible manufacturer tie-ins.  A completed chassis will cost around $585,000.
2005 Zulltec CZ-01 Specifications
Monocoque: Carbon fiber and aluminum honeycomb monocoque
Engine: Menard Competition Technologies UK, 90° V8, 3400 cc, 4 valves per cylinder
Horsepower: 490 hp @ 8500 rpm (with restrictor)
Torque: 304 lb-ft @ 7000 rpm
Gearbox: Ricardo Sequential 6 speed semi-automatic + reverse
Suspension: (F): double wishbones (R): double wishbones
Wheels: Magnesium (F): 18" dia. x 11" width (R): 18" dia. x 13" width
Brakes: Carbone Lorraine discs, Calipers AP Racing 6 pistons Dia.: 375 mm x 32 mm
Length: 4385 mm
Width:  1945 mm
Wheelbase: 2800 mm
Weight: 750 Kg
Tank capacity: 90 liters
6.22.05
>>The new Porsche LMP2 has been unveiled.  My initial thought is that the car is very conservative aerodynamically.  But that is somewhat a hallmark of Porsche car design.  The 956/962 were never seen as to be the particularly radical in the aero department and in fact their competitors quickly began to exploit an aerodynamic advantage even if they couldn't put the whole package together.
The Porsche is powered by a 3.4 liter normally aspirated V8.  The only thing that strikes me as unusual is the diameter of the (presumably) exhaust pipe protruding from the sidepod in front of the rear wheel.
While the design seems conservative, I don't think it a stretch to say that the Penske relationship will more than likely impart a revised look as the car is developed.  From these photos it appears that the car's build quality is very high.
6.11.05

>>Here are the renderings of the new Riley Mk.XIV LMP as promised.  My previous text description (originally posted on 6.2.05) is accurate enough to accompany these images I think:

The front end is striking with cooling inlets either side of the leading edge of the cockpit and a very prominent Bentley-esque nose/crash structure.  Radiators are mounted in the side pods and appear to exhaust out the engine bay.  The front splitter has the mandatory raised section and exhausts out shuttered exits just aft of the front wheels.   The cockpit shape itself is the as expected teardrop conforming to the mandated, template-driven, virtual hardpoints.

The engine exhaust exits out the top of the car through an opening that pokes out the trailing edge of the cockpit teardrop.  All very neat looking.  The sidepods are slightly offset inboard thus allowing for a small wheel arch bulge at the leading edge of the rear wheel well (as well as a small portion of exposed side splitter area running down the side of the car).  The rear engine deck and bodywork is extraordinarily low and is highlighted by the very large amount of exposed inboard rear fender surface area. The version I was shown still hadn't been detailed and it was admitted that blisters to contain the suspension would be added into the rear bodywork, further highlighting how low the rear deck actually is.  The rear fenders are unique in that they are pontoon shaped in planform.  Engine intakes (in this case the installation was a turbo V8) are located in front of the rear wheel fenders in a similar position (and intake shape) as on the Audi R8.  Overall the new car is visually reminiscent of previous Riley products with certain profiles evoking the MkIIIC in elevation and planform.
 

The accompanying press release indicates potential customer engine installations will include the above mentioned turbo V8s as well as normally aspirated V8s and V10s.  The price for a roller chassis is set at $675,000.

6.2.05

>>On Tuesday I met with Bill Riley at Riley Technologies as part of continuing research on the Intrepid GTP.  Bill was kind enough to let me have a look at the ongoing development of the new Riley LMP and I've been allowed to give my first hand impressions of what I saw on the CAD screen.  For starters, the version I was allowed to view is closed top.  The front end is striking with cooling inlets either side of the leading edge of the cockpit and a very prominent Bentley-esque nose/crash structure.  Radiators are mounted in the side pods and appear to exhaust out the engine bay.  The front splitter has the mandatory raised section and exhausts out shuttered exits just aft of the front wheels.   The cockpit shape itself is the as expected teardrop conforming to the mandated, template-driven, virtual hardpoints.  The engine exhaust exits out the top of the car through an opening that pokes out the trailing edge of the cockpit teardrop.  All very neat looking.  Although not particularly prominent and perhaps it was just my impression, but the sidepods seem to be slightly offset inboard thus allowing for a small wheel arch bulge at the leading edge of the rear wheel well (as well as a small portion of exposed side splitter area running down the side of the car).  The rear engine deck and bodywork is extraordinarily low and is highlighted by the very large amount of exposed inboard rear fender surface area. The version I was shown still hadn't been detailed and it was admitted that blisters to contain the suspension would be added into the rear bodywork, further highlighting how low the rear deck actually is.  The rear fenders are unique in that they are pontoon shaped in planform.  Engine intakes (in this case the installation was a turbo V8) are located in front of the rear wheel fenders in a similar position (and intake shape) as on the Audi R8.  Overall the new car is visually reminiscent of previous Riley products with certain profiles evoking the MkIIIC in elevation and planform.

For now interest is building and Bill mentions that the car will be LMP2 compliant if being slightly more difficult to meet the LMP2 750 kgs weight.  A image will be released in the next few coming weeks.

>>Following the Riley visit, I headed up the road to Dave Klym's FABCAR to further research the Porsche 962.  Klym graciously allowed me to view their original Porsche factory blueprints for the 962 tub.  He then proceeded to tell me about a little known project he worked on with Joest at the end of 1991.  Rheinhold Joest decided to install a Ryan Falconer V12 into one of his Porsche 962s.  The Falconer engine was chosen for its low cost ($45,000 crate motor) and power (more than the 962 turbo!).  The combined length of the Porsche 962 powerplant and bellhousing was such that the Falconer V12 could drop straight into the 962 chassis with just the addition of a small spacer.  The car tested at Roebling Road and Dave mentions that, "The Falconer V12 sounded just like a F1 engine!".  Klym even called Rheinhold Joest from the payphone at Roebling in order to allow him to hear the glorious V12 in the back of the Porsche chassis.  Alas Porsche got wind of the project and put the quash on it.  Ahhh, the might have been.... 
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©Copyright 2005, Michael J. Fuller