Revell 1/24 scale 2006 Audi R10
Images copyright  Bob Chapman @ Autosport Image and Michael J. Fuller
Text copyright Michael J. Fuller

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Of all the major plastic kit manufacturers, it was a surprise to see that Revell was the one to break the drought of Le Mans subjects.  It's hard to believe that the last plastic injection 1/24 scale prototype sportscar was Tamiya's Toyota GT-One in 2000.  Since then we've been entertained by the resin offerings, which are craftsman's dreams typically, but often break the bank.  Therefore it was refreshing to purchase Revell's Audi R10 for the paltry sum of $15.99 (Towerhobbies.com).  But how good would it be?
The kit consists of 105 pieces broken down into 7 sprues cast in gray and 1 sprue cast in clear plastic.  Four black rubber tires are also in the kit as well as the decal sheet.  Detail is average in the depiction of the engine bay area, but its a good starting off point for sure and superior when compared to the standard curbside offerings from the resin market.
The Revell kit depicts the Audi R10 in its Le Mans 2006 winning configuration.  The sole detail that determines this is the molded in low downforce louver package in the nose wheel arches as well as the lack of dive planes.  Overall the kit is faithful to the R10 and the shape seems accurate with no issues that I could find.  Casting detail is somewhat soft but not horrible by any stretch.  The molded in fastener detail (around the front louvers and pedal access hatch in the top of the monocoque foot box) is way over done with the hole diameter too large and additionally too deep.  These can easily be filled and either skipped over or redone.  The near spec ACO underfloor is accurately depicted though the strakes are much too thick.  And there are some sink marks in this area as the rear lower suspension arms are cast into the floor.  It's nice to see that they front diffuser is accurately portrayed allowing one a better idea of the "non-wing" wing that Audi created with the way the splitter and diffuser top side come to a common trailing edge.  All that's missing there is the gurney on the trailing edge!  At the rear, the wing adjustment slot details in the endplate are rather blobbish and soft and in need of sharpening up.  Fortunately the photo etch sets available (see below) both seem to address this.
I intentionally haven't done much comparison to see how accurate the kit's engine bay is.  From the gut I'd say its probably a fairly general rendition of the main engine bay volumes but I wouldn't think it even close from a nut and bolt stand point.  Details are soft, enough said.
In the intervening months since the Revell kit's release, the after market crowd has produced a couple of PE details sets.  Both Studio 27 ($13.00 @ mshobbies.com) and Dexter Models ($15.00 @ stradasports.com) have photo etch offerings.  In the mean time Dexter Models is also working on a transkit containing the large louver set and dive planes used by the R10 in the American Le Mans Series,  though there has been no annoucement of a release date as of yet.

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ęCopyright 2007, Michael J. Fuller